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Category Archives: ZZA. April 2015

THE WAR ROOM: LUIGI RODRIGUEZ KEEPS SLUGGING (4.27.15)

The WAR Room is back again, bringing you the 2015 advanced stats for every Cleveland minor leaguer. Though it is still early in the season, there are some interesting trends to watch and monitor as the season goes on. Join Jim Piascik as he breaks down Luigi Rodriguez continuing to become a top prospect again, Ryan Merritt making the Double-A jump, and much more as he takes you into The WAR Room.

As always, just like with scouting, it is always important to keep context in mind with these stats. A pitcher who is old for his level using that experience to succeed against young, inexperienced hitters must be taken with a grain of salt; the same goes when looking at these WAR totals.

But it is a useful tool to put each player’s performance into context and look at where they sit in regard to the rest of the league.

For reference on how I computed WAR, a reminder on the problems inherent in the stats, and everything else you need to know, click here. For a refresher on WAR and what it is, click here.

As a reminder, a 0.0 WAR per 162 games is replacement level — otherwise known as the kind of performance an average player from the level below could offer — a 2.0 WAR per 162 games is average, and a 5.0 WAR per 162 games is All-Star level.

Also, the lack of good defensive metrics for the minor leagues means we have to adjust for a range of defensive abilities. To account for this, I will give you each player’s WAR with a qualifier: either poor-defense WAR for a poor defender (-10 runs below-average per 162 games), average-defense WAR for an average defender (0 runs per 162 games), or great-defense WAR for a great defender (10 runs above-average per 162 games).

Additionally, note that pitchers have FIP-based WAR — which is based on peripherals like strikeouts, walks, home runs, etc. — and RA-based WAR — which is based on runs allowed.

One more thing, all “+” stats are averaged at 100. Anything over 100, like 110, is higher and means that player is 10 percent better than the league average. Anything under 100, like 90, is lower and means that player is 10 percent worse than the league average. In the case of any “-” stats — when lower is better, like with ERA — a 90 ERA- means that player is 10 percent better than the league average.

For the full stats, go ahead and click here. Stats are updated through Saturday, April 25.

Bradley Zimmer continues to lead the Hillcats in WAR, but he is essentially tied with fellow outfielder Luigi Rodriguez. Though we are only 12 games into Rodriguez’s bounce back campaign, the early returns for the former top prospect have been simply tremendous. It is not a leap to say Rodriguez’s 1.129 OPS (171 OPS+) and 236 wRC+ are the best early season performance of anyone in the organization, and while we will need to see it happen over months and years, not just weeks, it is hard not to be encouraged. Beyond the insane batted ball luck (.462 BABIP, 157 BABIP+), Rodriguez has walked as much as he has struck out (16.3% strikeout rate, 89 K%+; 16.3% walk rate, 191 BB%+), hit for as much power as Zimmer and Bobby Bradley in the early going (.229 isolated power, 228 ISO+), and generally looks like someone ready to make waves throughout 2015. Read more…

From Indians Baseball Insider, April 27, 2015

 
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Posted by on June 11, 2015 in ZZA. April 2015

 

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AROUND THE FARM: APRIL 26, 2015 (4.27.15)

Pitchers like Kime, Chen help lead a perfect six-for-six day for Cleveland’s minor league teams.

Around the Farm takes a quick look at some of yesterday’s performances by Cleveland prospects throughout the system. The positions listed below are where the player was playing in yesterday’s game.

SCOREBOARD

(Game 1) R H E (Game 2) R H E
Louisville 1 3 1 Louisville 2 7 0
Columbus 7 13 0 Columbus 4 9 0
Box Score Box Score
R H E (Game 1) R H E
Bowie 1 5 2 Lynchburg 6 7 2
Akron 7 9 1 Potomac 5 9 2
Box Score Box Score
(Game 2) R H E R H E
Lynchburg 6 11 0 Great Lakes 0 2 3
Potomac 3 5 0 Lake County 6 11 0
Box Score Box Score

HIGHLIGHTS

Dace Kime (SP, Lake County): W (1-2), 7.0 IP, 2 H, 0 R, 0 BB, 12 SO. Sometimes, the best thing to have with prospects is patience. Following a 5.22 ERA in 136.1 innings last year in Lake County, the easy knee-jerk reaction was to declare the third round pick in 2013 a bust and certain reliever. The second full professional season is when some prospects finally find their stride, however, as they have the experience of having gone through a full professional season the year before. That could be what is happening with Kime this year, because while the 23-year-old needs to be pitching in High-A soon given his advanced age, it is naturally great to see the right-hander posting a 1.85 ERA and 25:3 SO:BB through 24.1 innings in 2015. Read More…

From Indians Baseball Insider, April 27, 2015

 
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Posted by on June 11, 2015 in ZZA. April 2015

 

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THE WAR ROOM: ZIMMER’S STANDING OUT IN HIGH-A (4.20.15)

The WAR Room is back again, bringing you the 2015 advanced stats for every Cleveland minor leaguer. Though it is still early in the season, there are some interesting trends to watch and monitor as the season goes on. Join Jim Piascik as he breaks down Bradley Zimmer’s Mike Trout impression, Francisco Lindor’s surprisingly decent season to date, and much more as he takes you into The WAR Room.

As always, just like with scouting, it is always important to keep context in mind with these stats. A pitcher who is old for his level using that experience to succeed against young, inexperienced hitters must be taken with a grain of salt; the same goes when looking at these WAR totals.

But it is a useful tool to put each player’s performance into context and look at where they sit in regard to the rest of the league.

For reference on how I computed WAR, a reminder on the problems inherent in the stats, and everything else you need to know, click here. For a refresher on WAR and what it is, click here.

As a reminder, a 0.0 WAR per 162 games is replacement level — otherwise known as the kind of performance an average player from the level below could offer — a 2.0 WAR per 162 games is average, and a 5.0 WAR per 162 games is All-Star level.

Also, the lack of good defensive metrics for the minor leagues means we have to adjust for a range of defensive abilities. To account for this, I will give you each player’s WAR with a qualifier: either poor-defense WAR for a poor defender (-10 runs below-average per 162 games), average-defense WAR for an average defender (0 runs per 162 games), or great-defense WAR for a great defender (10 runs above-average per 162 games).

Additionally, note that pitchers have FIP-based WAR — which is based on peripherals like strikeouts, walks, home runs, etc. — and RA-based WAR — which is based on runs allowed.

One more thing, all “+” stats are averaged at 100. Anything over 100, like 110, is higher and means that player is 10 percent better than the league average. Anything under 100, like 90, is lower and means that player is 10 percent worse than the league average. In the case of any “-” stats — when lower is better, like with ERA — a 90 ERA- means that player is 10 percent better than the league average.

For the full stats, go ahead and click here. Stats are updated through Saturday, April 18.

The WAR Room featured outfielder Bradley Zimmer last week, which would typically mean someone else would be highlighted here. But with Zimmer putting up Mike Trout-level numbers through 10 games — headlined by 0.7 average-defense WAR and a .324 isolated power (299 ISO+) — the outfielder is able to break the mold. Zimmer’s early-season surge is not really a BABIP mirage as his .320 BABIP (109 BABIP+) is perfectly normal and the outfielder is not showing a ton of swing and miss either (20.0% strikeout rate, 106 K%+). Just a dozen or so games into his full season career, Zimmer is doing nothing to dissuade the organization from thinking he is ready for the challenge of Double-A. Read More…

From Indians Baseball Insider, April 20, 2015

 
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Posted by on June 11, 2015 in ZZA. April 2015

 

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AROUND THE FARM: APRIL 19, 2015 (4.20.15)

D.J. Brown racks up a ton of strikeouts in a Hillcats win on a day marred by rainouts.

Note that the Columbus Clippers’ game was postponed due to rain and the Lake County Captains’ game was suspended in the top of the fourth inning. Of note on the transaction wire, Bobby Bradley was “sent” to the Mahoning Valley roster on Sunday after being replaced at first base with two outs left in the fifth inning on Saturday. It is not a demotion and instead the Indians are making room on the Lake County roster while they evaluate him for a possible injury.

SCOREBOARD

R H E R H E
Akron 0 7 1 Potomac 1 6 1
Altoona 7 12 0 Lynchburg 4 10 2
Box Score Box Score
R H E R H E
Toledo Lake County  4  7  0
Columbus Bowling Green  0  2  0
PPD Suspended

HIGHLIGHTS

D.J. Brown (RP, Lynchburg): W (1-0), 5.0 IP, 1 H, 0 R, 1 BB, 6 SO. Though Brown technically was the relief pitcher on Sunday, the right-hander pitched a starting pitcher’s load and truly impressed. This outing more than doubled Brown’s strikeout total on the season and gives him 11 in 12.0 innings, a strong rate when combined with allowing only three walks. Brown started a good number of games in High-A last year and if his increase in strikeouts is real, he could be a new pitcher in 2015. Read More…

From Indians Baseball Insider, April 20, 2015

 
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Posted by on June 11, 2015 in ZZA. April 2015

 

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THE WAR ROOM: CHANG, BAKER COME OUT STRONG (4.13.15)

The WAR Room is back again, bringing you the 2015 advanced stats for every Cleveland minor leaguer. Though it is still early in the season, there are some interesting trends to watch and monitor as the season goes on. Join Jim Piascik as he breaks down Yu-Cheng Chang’s red-hot start in Lake County, Dylan Baker continuing to impress in first outings, and much more as he takes you into The WAR Room.

As always, just like with scouting, it is always important to keep context in mind with these stats. A pitcher who is old for his level using that experience to succeed against young, inexperienced hitters must be taken with a grain of salt; the same goes when looking at these WAR totals.

But it is a useful tool to put each player’s performance into context and look at where they sit in regard to the rest of the league.

For reference on how I computed WAR, a reminder on the problems inherent in the stats, and everything else you need to know, click here. For a refresher on WAR and what it is, click here.

As a reminder, a 0.0 WAR per 162 games is replacement level — otherwise known as the kind of performance an average player from the level below could offer — a 2.0 WAR per 162 games is average, and a 5.0 WAR per 162 games is All-Star level.

Also, the lack of good defensive metrics for the minor leagues means we have to adjust for a range of defensive abilities. To account for this, I will give you each player’s WAR with a qualifier: either poor-defense WAR for a poor defender (-10 runs below-average per 162 games), average-defense WAR for an average defender (0 runs per 162 games), or great-defense WAR for a great defender (10 runs above-average per 162 games).

Additionally, note that pitchers have FIP-based WAR — which is based on peripherals like strikeouts, walks, home runs, etc. — and RA-based WAR — which is based on runs allowed.

One more thing, all “+” stats are averaged at 100. Anything over 100, like 110, is higher and means that player is 10 percent better than the league average. Anything under 100, like 90, is lower and means that player is 10 percent worse than the league average. In the case of any “-” stats — when lower is better, like with ERA — a 90 ERA- means that player is 10 percent better than the league average.

For the full stats, go ahead and click here. Stats are updated through Saturday, April 11.

Apparently right-hander Dylan Baker has a flair for pitching in his first outing of the season. After going 18-up, 18-down in his first start of 2014, Baker threw five no-hit innings with a 56.3% strikeout rate (271 K%+) in his first start of this year, picking up where he left off when healthy in High-A. A freak injury last year derailed Baker — he broke his ankle while running to the mound of his second start last year — but provided fate does not play the right-hander a cruel joke again in 2015, Baker seems ready to conquer High-A and take a shot at Double-A later this year. Read More…

From Indians Baseball Insider, April 13, 2015

 
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AROUND THE FARM: APRIL 12, 2015 (4.13.15)

Bautista, Pannone lead the Captains to victory during a rough day in the Cleveland organization.

Around the Farm takes a quick look at some of yesterday’s performances by Cleveland prospects throughout the system. The positions listed below are where the player was playing in yesterday’s game.

SCOREBOARD

R H E R H E
Columbus 1 3 0 Binghamton 6 10 0
Indianapolis 2 8 2 Akron 2 2 1
Box Score Box Score
R H E R H E
Lynchburg 0 5 1 Bowling Green 1 5 0
Potomac 5 9 3 Lake County 2 5 3
Box Score Box Score

HIGHLIGHTS

Claudio Bautista (2B, Lake County): 2-for-3, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 HR, 2 RBI, 1 BB, 1 E. The first two games of Bautista’s 2015 season were not great, but he more than made up for that small sample of disappointment with Sunday’s game. Bautista is a solid prospect repeating Low-A, and while not seeing the second baseman promoted to Lynchburg is disappointing, if he keeps hitting like this, Bautista will force his way to a promotion before too long. The second baseman’s lack of walks was an issue last year, and games like this where he combines his power with a walk are good to see. Read More…

From Indians Baseball Insider, April 12, 2015

 
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Posted by on June 11, 2015 in ZZA. April 2015

 

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THE WAR ROOM: 2015 SEASON PREVIEW (4.7.15)

The WAR Room is back again, bringing you the advanced stats for every Cleveland minor leaguer. Join Jim Piascik as he asks 10 important questions about Cleveland’s minor leaguers heading into 2015, including those surrounding Francisco Lindor, how the ages of prospects effect how we need to think of their performances at their respective levels, and much more.

Over the past months, IBI rolled out the year-end rankings for every minor league affiliate in the Cleveland system and a Top 100 countdown based on age-adjusted WAR, and a position-by-position organizational breakdown using the same age-adjusted WAR.

Now, as we await the first games of 2015, I ask 10 important statistical questions about Cleveland’s minor leaguers entering the season.

For reference on how I computed WAR, a reminder on the problems inherent in the stats, and everything else you need to know, click here. For a refresher on WAR and what it is, click here.

As a reminder, a 0.0 WAR per 162 games is replacement level — otherwise known as the kind of performance an average player from the level below could offer — a 2.0 WAR per 162 games is average, and a 5.0 WAR per 162 games is All-Star level.

Also, the lack of good defensive metrics for the minor leagues means we have to adjust for a range of defensive abilities. To account for this, I will give you each player’s WAR with a qualifier: either poor-defense WAR for a poor defender (-10 runs below-average per 162 games), average-defense WAR for an average defender (0 runs per 162 games), or great-defense WAR for a great defender (10 runs above-average per 162 games).

Additionally, note that pitchers have FIP-based WAR — which is based on peripherals like strikeouts, walks, home runs, etc. — and RA-based WAR — which is based on runs allowed.

One more thing, all “+” stats are averaged at 100. Anything over 100, like 110, is higher and means that player is 10 percent better than the league average. Anything under 100, like 90, is lower and means that player is 10 percent worse than the league average. In the case of any “-” stats — when lower is better, like with ERA — a 90 ERA- means that player is 10 percent better than the league average.

The 2014 year-end season in review for every affiliate is listed below:

And here are the links to the Top 100 countdown:

And here are the links to the positional breakdowns:

As we wait for the minor league games to begin and give us new data to interpret, here are 10 important storylines that will frame future editions of The WAR Room in 2015:

#1 How does Francisco Lindor fare in his second chance at Triple-A?

Though Lindor is still young — entering his age-21 season — now that he is in Triple-A, the performance is really starting to matter. His minor league WAR was not all that bad during his turn in Columbus, however, the underlying issues with his peripherals were a real problem. The organization is not going to promote Lindor to the majors on potential; unless he is putting up big numbers in the WAR (and other statistical) departments, he will still be waiting for that elusive major league call. Read More…

From Indians Baseball Insider, April 7, 2015

 
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Posted by on June 11, 2015 in ZZA. April 2015

 

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